International Fair kicks off its 11th annual study abroad fair

On Sept. 8 the

Office of International Affairs hosted the 11th annual

study abroad fair in their new home at the New Academic Classroom

Building.

On Sept. 8 the Office of International Affairs hosted the 11th annual study abroad fair in their new home at the New Academic Classroom Building.

“The purpose of the study aboard fair is to raise awareness on campus for faculty and students for them to understand there are international opportunities and for students to know they can receive academic credit while studying in other country, ” says Dr. Sandy Smith, director of institutional global relations.

The fair showcased various tables decorated with different artifacts and pictures, as well as representatives from study abroad programs. These representatives helped give more information on what it takes to participate in these opportunities. Students also were able to sign up for a program. According to Smith, the fair was a six-month planning process.

North Carolina A&T students have gone to many different countries such as China, Japan, Spain, and England. Sometimes the students live with a local family or they stay in an international dormitory on campus with other international students says Smith.

“The benefits of studying aboard are having developed a global awareness and taking that with them to the work place once they graduate,” says Smith. “Learn to be adaptable to another situation so they learn that skill and they can adapt to any situation.”

In order to study aboard, students must have a minimum grade point average of 2.5 and have studied at the semester for two semesters.

A lot of A&T students were at the fair sharing their own personal experiences with students and faculty as well.

Darrian Boost, a junior, chemistry major from Indianapolis, IN went to San Jose, Costa Rica and studied there for five weeks. Boost says has been interested in studying aboard since here days in high school.

“The Costa Rican is very different from what we have in here the United States,” he says. “They have this funny thing called ”tico time” so normally for us if we are five to ten minutes late you are considered late but in Costa Rica say you say you are gonna be somewhere at 2:00 if you show up at 3:00 it is acceptable. There are really laid back and really chill.”

Boost enjoyed the academic atmosphere and took different medical courses. According to Boost “studying aboard takes you out of your comfort zone and amerce yourself in someone else’s culture.”

 

  • Sejal Chappell,Contributor