Play brings a taste of Greece to A&T

The department of visual and performing arts and the Paul Roberson Theatre at N. C. A&T presents “An Evening of Classics” on April 12-15 and 19-22.

The department of visual and performing arts and the Paul Roberson Theatre at N. C. A&T presents “An Evening of Classics” on April 12-15 and 19-22.

The play began set in the Greek Era, 600-200 B.C. Act I included two scenes and two dramatic monologues.

Even with narration between each scene, the era was difficult to understand due to the vernacular, which was drastically different than what we use today. It challenging to follow what the characters were saying and what situations they were facing.

Though hard to follow, the first act of the play was a excellent display of the performer’s acting abilities.

After a 10-minute intermission the play resumed with the first scene of Act II which was “The Elizabethan Period,” 1550-1625, named after the first Queen Elizabeth. Both of the scenes and monologues came from William Shakespeare.

In the comical scene from his play “The Taming of the Shrew” the actors utilized the entire stage in a chase between a shrewd young girl and a determined fellow.

The students even used theatre lights and sound effects when creating thundering and lightning for the scene “The Tragedy of Macbeth.”

Scene two was “The Restoration Period,” 1660-1710, and was named after the restoration of King Charles II to his throne.

Narrators informed the audience that the period was a great time for theater and gave background information on the social standards of this era. The theme of each scene was love. All of the scenes in this era were comical and witty and really helped to bring the play to a “feel good” closing.

I give this play a B+ because of the acting talents, theatrical lighting and sound, and costumes. The last scene was much more cheerful than the rest and the intensity decreased but the acting did not. The students displayed high energy and excitement every second they were on stage.

The costumes, lighting and sound effects were appropriate and added to the excitement of the show. The play does not receive an A because it was not relatable or understandable most times. Unless you have a passion for theatre arts or history you will find yourself more impressed with the expression in the acting more than what is actually being said.

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  • Courtney Matthews Contributor