N.C. A&T celebrates five-year partnership with Corning and the inaugural class of Corning Scholars

Jamille Whitlow, Managing Editor

This morning, Corning Incorporated and North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University celebrated their five-year partnership and Corning’s inaugural scholars program in the Deese Ballroom.  

The partnership provides several opportunities for students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and education. Funding will be given to students in the following departments: College of Engineering, College of Science and Technology, Willie A. Deese College of Business and Economics and College of Education. 

The partnership will continue until 2026, what sets Corning apart is their focus on the future of minority teachers and K-12 STEM education. Olivia Rogers, an elementary education student, expressed how she looks forward to more events such as the luncheon

“ I’m most excited about the workshops and events such as this one where we get to meet people and learn new skills and talk to the other scholars,” Rogers said. 

The Corning Scholars and Fellows Program has 53 recipients from the departments that were listed above. During the event, Corning leaders had lunch with 30 of the scholars to network and bring insight about college and  the company. 

After the luncheon, Corning leaders visited the departments that are funded through the company. The event concluded with a reception that was open to the campus where recruiting staff can talk about different career opportunities. 

Ron Verkleeren, Senior vice president of life science, is excited about the campus tour of N.C. A&T and  to connect with students. 

“ I’m personally looking forward to connecting the number of students that have recently joined us, meeting some additional faculty members, and connecting with a very good friend of mine, Willie Deese.” 

Willie A. Deese, a 1977 A&T graduate and co-chair of the university’s capital campaign,  made a surprise visit at the Corning luncheon where he talked to Corning leaders and talked to students on a one-on-one basis. 

“ Corning is a great institution, built on engineering and technical excellence, and that aligns so well with what A&T does. It makes sense that one of the leading manufacturers of glass and glass related products would partner with the No. 1 HBCU and the No. 1 engineering college at an HBCU,” Deese said. 

Corning is responsible for manufacturing materials science in every aspect of human life. Over the last 170 years, Corning’s  market covers electronics, automotive life sciences, and even more.  For 50 years, Corning has employed close to 5,000 in North Carolina. They have seven facilities in North Carolina: Durham, Concord, Charlotte, Hickory, Winston-Salem, Newton, Tarboro and Wilmington. 

Provided by the university’s joint press release with Corning, the inaugural class of Corning Scholars and Fellows are listed below with their hometowns, study program, and college: 

  • Pia Agliam, Fayetteville, N.C., mechanical engineering, College of Engineering
  • Kaleb Artis, Greensboro, N.C., mechanical engineering, College of Engineering
  • Ny’Asia Badger, Columbia, S.C., computer science, College of Engineering
  • Adam Bearden, Columbia, S.C, chemical engineering, College of Engineering
  • Devin Boyd, Charlotte, N.C., MBA, Deese College
  • Taylor Brotherton, Burgaw, N.C., teaching, College of Education
  • Quiorra Brown, Richmond, V.A., MBA, Deese College
  • Brendan Bryan, Upper Marlboro, M.D., computer science, College of Engineering
  • Bria Caison, Wake Forest, N.C., bioengineering, College of Engineering
  • Cameron Chambers, Charlotte, N.C.,  computer engineering, College of Engineering
  • Brandon Davis, Greensboro, N.C.,  mechanical engineering, College of Engineering
  • Nigel Devane, Greensboro, N.C.,  information technology, COST
  • Torrance Eberhart, Greensboro, N.C.,  mechanical engineering, College of Engineering
  • Ahkenaton Furdge, Clarksdale, M.S., electrical engineering, College of Engineering
  • Abdur-Raqib Gant, Princeville, N.C., mechanical engineering, College of Engineering
  • Marega Halimatou, Chicago, I.L.,  elementary education, College of Education
  • Lauren Haynes, Buford, G.A., chemistry, COST
  • Taylor Headen, Greensboro, N.C.,  computer science, College of Engineering
  • Niya Henderson, La Plata, M.D., computer science, College of Engineering
  • Steven Henderson, Greensboro, N.C., MBA, Deese College
  • Kevin Hilliard, Greensboro, N.C.,  computer science, College of Engineering
  • Hannah Hunter, Bluffton, S.C., elementary education, College of Education
  • Tatyana Jackson, Roslindale, M.A., chemistry, COST
  • Pernell Johnson, Durham, N.C.,  computer engineering, College of Engineering
  • Sidney Johnson, Charlotte, N.C., computer science, College of Engineering
  • Alexandra Jones, Hope Mills, N.C., physics, COST
  • Moraya Lewis, Charlotte, N.C., elementary education, College of Education
  • Brandon Manns, Reidsville, N.C., computer engineering, College of Engineering
  • Tony Martin, Greensboro, N.C., industrial and systems engineering, College of Engineering
  • Aliyah McCray, Greensboro, N.C., F.L.,  MBA, Deese College
  • Jessica Mitchell, Thonotosassa, F.L., computer science, College of Engineering
  • Anthony Odom, Red Springs, N.C., elementary education, College of Education
  • Lynn Ogot, Fuqua-Varina, N.C., bioengineering, College of Engineering
  • Edwin Onugha, Raleigh, N.C., data science and engineering, College of Engineering
  • Jasmine Pollock, Fredericksburg, V.A., MBA, Deese College
  • Zephaniah Prince, Selma, N.C., mechanical engineering, College of Engineering
  • Ryan Reese, Greensboro, N.C., electrical engineering, College of Engineering
  • Taniya Robertson, Laurens, S.C., mechanical engineering, College of Engineering
  • Amina Robinson, Durham, N.C., bioengineering, College of Engineering
  • Olivia Rogers, Pfafftown, N.C., elementary education, College of Education
  • Paula Salmon, Greensboro, N.C., teaching, College of Education
  • Makynzie Sprinkle, Winston-Salem, N.C., elementary education, College of Education
  • Allison Stegall, Colonial Beach, V.A.,  teaching, College of Education
  • Jeremy Stowe, Greensboro, N.C., mechanical engineering, College of Engineering
  • Trevor Surratt, Garysburg, N.C.,  bioengineering, College of Engineering
  • Mikayla Thornton, Durham, N.C., computer science, College of Engineering
  • Daniel Tobias, High Point, N.C., data science and engineering, College of Engineering
  • Nathan Vazquez, High Point, N.C., civil engineering, College of Engineering
  • Jared Via, Greensboro, N.C., MBA, Deese College
  • Laila Watts, Easley, S.C., elementary education, College of Education
  • Christopher Williams, Wagram, N.C., industrial and systems engineering, College of Engineering
  • T’Asia Williamson, Goldsboro, N.C., elementary education, College of Education
  • Kojo Wilson, Gibsonville, N.C., teaching, College of Education