N.C. A&T students Mental Health Check-in

N.C. A&T students Mental Health Check-in

Kaila Collier, Contributor

N.C. A&T students Mental Health Check-in

With the fall semester dwindling down to its final weeks, mental health for college students are tested beyond measures. Students at N.C. A&T shared their thoughts on how they’ve dealt with stress all semester.

Through these interviews I learned how much we need to be there for one another better, and checking up on our classmates is more important than we can ever imagine.

Jayla Watts, a sophomore psychology student, says that she is doing alright thus far. She believes a trip back home to Georgia is well overdue.

“I’m doing okay. I’ve been better. I think being away from home is taking a toll on me,” Watts said.

Being from Conyers, Georgia I shared in her homesickness as well. Being an out-of-state student can be difficult at times, but together we learned that we are not alone in our sadness.

Zya Boyd, a junior public relations student, says the semester thus far has been okay for herself and hopes to finish the semester strong.

“I’ve had a few personal obstacles that have been affecting my participation in school, but I’m praying for a good finish,” Boyd said.

As the semester comes to a close, it is imperative that students remember important dates for the closing of the semester as we will be remote and synchronous. This Final Exam Schedule will keep you up to date with your examinations order. 

Gabrielle Heyward, a freshman journalism and mass communications student, says this semester has been beyond impactful as it was her first semester on campus. 

“My adjustment to college life has been very smooth and I’ve been feeling very enlightened to all that N.C. A&T has to offer,” Heyward said. “At times it’s a little overwhelming because N.C. A&T has so much.

Kayla Walton, a sophomore mass media productions student, says mentally she is drained and exhausted between work and school. 

“I am just trying to maintain momentum as it seems the semester is coming to an end and more work is being piled on,” Walton said.

Wesley Worrell, a sophomore mass communications student, says “I’m feeling pretty drained, but I just have to push through.”

The Student Health Advisory Council hosted a zoom meeting titled “Mental Realness.” This online event centered around how pop culture, university culture and politics affect the mental health of college students. 

The host of this event, Nicole Smith, a senior marketing student, explained that the event dissected what 2021 was like and how it affected our mental health in both good and bad ways.

Between the Presidential election, The Black Lives Matter Protests and  Covid-19 these events all play a factor into our mental state. These things built up much anxiety, depression, loneliness and uncertainty. 

“We discussed how quarantine could be seen in a positive light. It allowed us to take a moment to be still, self reflect and find inner peace and happiness through solitude,” Smith said “As it relates to university culture, we must remember to live up to our own expectations, and not any expectations from our peers. There is power in words and the pressure students feel on this campus to be like everyone else is astounding, and needs to be addressed.”

The event concluded with some advice. We must live for ourselves, go our own path and lean on our support systems because they will be there regardless of what is going on in life. Exhaust all options, before you go to any extremes. 

The N.C. A&T Counseling services are always here for those in need of guidance. Currently, students can call the Counseling Center at 336-334-7727 or email at [email protected] to start the process of getting connected with a counselor for either a telephone or video call.