Student details quarantining experience at N.C. A&T

Jarod Hamilton

Jarod Hamilton, Editor-in-Chief

Any other year, Haley Hall is a co-ed freshmen dorm for students at North Carolina A&T but this year it serves as the isolation unit for students who contract COVID-19. 

The pandemic has created many scenarios for students as far as how they completed their school work, whether that be having all of their classes on campus, having all their classes virtually, or a hybrid schedule which is a mix of the two former options. 

Marisa Comer, a senior journalism and mass communications student and resident assistant at N.C. A&T decided to return to campus but contracted the virus and was sent to Haley Hall to quarantine, which she referred to as a ‘jail’.

“Never been to prison or anything, but I compared it to prison,” Comer said.

Students are not forced to stay at the suite-style dorm, as they can choose to go back home to their place of residence. Despite not loving the idea of going to Haley Hall, it was a relatively quick decision for Comer to make.

“My dad is a type 2 diabetic, so just that in itself…Just…I didn’t want to bring anything home,” Comer said.

Comer admitted that the prison-like feel was mainly due to the restrictions and lack of freedom students have while serving their 10-day quaratines.

“I could not be around my friends or if I wanted to go for a drive or sit in my car to clear my thoughts,” Comer said. “If I am thinking a lot I usually just sit in my car.”

Upon admittance to Haley Hall students will get free linen, a pillow, a mini-fridge, a microwave and a desktop computer in their dorm. Students also receive three meals a day via the Williams Dining Hall. The food is wrapped up in plastic bags and left on the door handles of the suite along with beverages. 

While Haley Hall is not the most comfortable way to quarantine it is a good resource for students who want to effectively quarantine themselves without the fear of spreading the virus.